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  • Rickshaw Art Collections around the World | Rickshaw Art Archive

    Rickshaw Art Collections around the World ​ Please switch to desktop mode if you are using a mobile browser Go back

  • Badal | Rickshaw Art Archive

    বাদল/Badal: 4th Solo Painting Exhibition of Artist Nobo Kumar Bhadra ​ "The beginning was about living not love." Starting his journey painting cinema banners in the 1980s, Nobo Kumar Bhadra has now established a recognizable footprint in the rickshaw painting scene of Bangladesh. His works depict the evanescent days of old cinema protagonists and antagonists, their cinematic expression so fumbled with bold strokes; heritage and mythoi of Bengal; anthropomorphic animals like fox, such and lion riding boats, having a day at the jungle- all drawn with bright saturated colors vibrant with life. The artist's 4th solo exhibition will be hosted by the Department of English, Jahangirnagar University. This three-day exhibition starting on 25th September 2016 will feature his artworks (including painting and installation art) that amalgamate the folk and the fantastic. ​ 25-27 September 2016 Date: Department of English, Jahangirnagar University Venue: Siam Raihan Nafis Photo courtesy: ​ Installation Shots Badal (21) © Siam Raihan Nafis Badal (4) © Siam Raihan Nafis Badal (22) © Siam Raihan Nafis 1/22 Go back

  • Rickshaw: The Vehicle | Rickshaw Art Archive

    Rickshaw: The Vehicle Special thanks to for such an amazing 3d model of rickshaw. Ashna Choudhury Ashna Choudhury is an emerging 3d artist and animator who recently graduated from the University of California, Berkeley with a Major in Art Practice and a Minor in Electrical Engineering & Computer Science. Ashna wants to tell stories that will move people, connect to them, inspire them, heal them, and most importantly, represent them. ​ Please switch to desktop mode if you are using a mobile browser Go back

  • Evolution of Rickshaw Art | Rickshaw Art Archive

    Evolution of Rickshaw Art ​ References Gallagher, Rob. . Dhaka: The University Press Limited, 1992. The Rickshaws of Bangladesh Glassie, Henry, and Firoz Mahmud. . Dhaka: Bangladesh National Museum, 2000. Contemporary Traditional Art of Bangladesh Glassie, Henry. “The Pictorial System.” In , 433-437. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1997. Art and life in Bangladesh Glassie, Henry. . Dhaka: Bangladesh Academy, 2000. Traditional Art of Dhaka Kirkpatrick, Joanna. “Bangladeshi Arts of the Ricksha.” , December 5, 1997, Asianart.com http://www.asianart.com/articles/ricksha/index.html Kirkpatrick, Joanna. “Rickshaw Revelations.” , 04 August 2004, Outlook https://www.outlookindia.com/website/story/rickshaw-revelations/224712/?next Kirkpatrick, Joanna. “The Painted Ricksha as Culture Theater.” 10, no. 3 (1984): 73-85. Studies in Visual Communication Kirkpatrick, Joanna. . Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2003. CD-ROM. Transports of Delight: The Ricksha Arts of Bangladesh Learmonth, Tom. "Rickshaw Art in Bangladesh." 39 (1991): 76-79. Mimar: Architecture in Development Mahmud, Firoz. “The Rickshaw and Rickshaw Painting in Dhaka City.” In , edited by Sanjay Garg, 160-172. Colombo: SAARC Cultural Centre, 2015. Traditional Knowledge and Traditional Cultural Expressions of South Asia ​ Please switch to desktop mode if you are using a mobile browser Go back

  • Rongbaaz, Rickshaw, Revival | Rickshaw Art Archive

    , Rickshaw, Revival Rongbaaz ​ Mohammad Zaki Rezwan April 2020 ​ It was in the early 2000s when Dhaka banned baby taxis from its streets to reduce air pollution. Dhakaites were then introduced to CNG-powered auto-vehicles for their urban commute. Those new vehicles were painted entirely green to maintain a sense of uniformity. This decision might have eased some of their environmental concerns, but what many did not discern at that moment was the extinction of baby taxi art. A few years later, indomitable flowers started blooming on the sides of these vehicles. Quite similarly to this unexpected emergence, bunches of flowers also started blooming on the walls of white cubes, be it as a parasite, host, or both. ​ , undertaken at Britto Art Space, seeks collaboration among several contemporary Bangladeshi artists – Aminul Islam Ashik, Jewel A Rob, Lutfun Nahar, Mahbubur Rahman, Shimul Dutta, Shimul Saha, Tayeba Begum Lipi, Yasmin Jahan Nupur, Mohammad Hanif Pappu, and Tapan Das – from seemingly different modes of art practices. Even though Britto Arts Trust has previously accommodated similar projects within their institutional framework, this one eventually turns out as more self-referential than the others. The first thing that can grab anyone’s attention is the mirror hanged on one of the columns upon which the white cube gallery stands. Framed by decorative materials typically seen on the hood of rickshaws, this mirror evinces how the project banks on the dominance of rickshaw and cinema banner painting in Bangladeshi public domain to turn this white cube into a public domain. Nevertheless, it could hardly recapitulate the entire cube in its reflection, let alone what exists beyond. Yet, the viewers can situate themselves against or within the institution in that restricted reflection and explore the apparent contention between the public domain and institutional domain in Bangladesh. Rongbaaz ​ The term rongbaaz is popularly referred to as someone who defies the law and order. How is this project ambitioning to become a space for the rongbaaz of the Bangladeshi art landscape? The venture correlates with Andrea Fraser’s idea of an institution of critique by acknowledging its inextricability from the institution followed by an examination of its function. Like graffiti, artists of this exhibition vandalized the facade of their institution even after being cognizant about the expunction of this makeover once the exhibition would be over. Not only do such temporal and spatial restrictions hint at the infrastructural limitation of local art and cultural institutions, but they also confess how even with lesser endorsement rickshaw art and cinema banner practice have thrived and been mobilizing the public sphere for nearly half a century. ​ The collaboration envisions a new language in contemporary arts at the crossroads of different streams of artistic thoughts. The incorporation of the aesthetic language used by rickshaw or cinema banner artists into Leonardo da Vinci’s The Last Supper deliberately demonstrates disorientation, if not only defiance. The conjoining of the flamboyant color palette, the lotus platform, and the narcissistic figuration of the selves in the work initiates a process of de-westernization and self-criticism. For both art and human history, Vinci’s painting, as well as the moment captured within, marks a new era. The question is how and to what extent is doing it. Rongbaaz ​ Often overgeneralized (and mistreated) as naive or primitive for being pastiche and vernacular, both rickshaw art and cinema banner painting practices require a thorough investigation, both artistically and academically. The reenactment of some of the epochs of Western art, culture, and civilization—for example, Vinci’s artistic reawakening and Sam Shaw’s iconic sexualization of Marilyn Monroe—tests the expandability and adaptability of these practices without maiming their core values. The visual retracing of pop icons from both east and west reminisces the postmodern movement of Andy Warhol that once incepted the critical potential of pastiche. Besides, dramatic moments taken from Bangla films manifest how affective experiences can traverse different aesthetic domains, for example, film and painting. Shelved within reach and encompassed by the utilitarian philosophy of rickshaw and cinema banner painting, the painted pots and pans remind how these practices are going through material and consumerist evolution due to the inimical economy. ​ All these cohesively fractured images eventually contemplate the frontiers stationed in between high and low, pastiche and original, institutionalized and noninstitutionalized. As emphasized repeatedly, the true success of Rongbaaz lies in the fact that it intentionally fails to challenge the trajectory of these so-called naive art practices, instead reflecting on the self at large. ​ Exhibition link: http://brittoartstrust.org/2020/02/02/rongbaaz/ ​ Originally published in: https://www.showcase.com.bd/2020/04/20/rongbaaz-rickshaw-revival/ ​ ​ Go back

  • About | Rickshaw Art Archive

    About An encounter with rickshaw art is impossible to avoid while roaming around the streets of Bangladesh. Purely intended for research and documentation, Rickshaw Art Archive reminisces this encounter and traverses the ever-changing milieus of Bangladesh. ​ Our goal is simple – to create a database of rickshaw art that will cater to the scholars and researchers studying the art and visual culture of Bangladesh. We are mostly interested in documenting what is out on the streets or made it physically on the sides of rickshaw vehicles so that the true essence of rickshaw art can be documented and further analyzed. ​ To understand what influences our archiving method, please read “ ” from Public Access Digital Media Archive ( ). 10 Theses on the Archive Pad.ma ​ We are deeply indebted to all the photographers and contributors for their contribution in building this archive. ​ Unless stated otherwise, this archive does not hold the copyright of any of the materials it shares. Please contact the respective artists and/or photo contributors if you want to use any materials. ​ We are actively seeking contributions to grow. Please visit the section for further information. contribute ​ If you have any questions or concerns, please . contact us Project Team ​ | Mohammad Zaki Rezwan Founder, Developer, Coordinator, & Editor MA in Comparative Media Arts, Simon Fraser University, Canada MA in Literatures in English and Cultural Studies, Jahangirnagar University, Bangladesh Editor, Comparative Media Arts Journal, Simon Fraser University, Canada ​ | Qazi Arka Rahman Advisor PhD student, West Virginia University, USA Faculty (on leave), Jagannath University, Bangladesh ​ | Samirah Tabassum Research Assistant MA in Literatures in English and Cultural Studies, Department of English, Jahangirnagar University, Bangladesh ​

  • Rickshaw Art Archive

    Inward, but only to be outward -- Rickshaw Art Archive is finally ready, perhaps to reach its full potential. Thanks to contributors from all around the world, the archive has now over 100 items, among which the earliest dates back to the 1960s. Explore

  • Resources | Rickshaw Art Archive

    | | | | Interactive Information Select Publications Exhibitions/Projects Essays/Review Documentary/Video Works Interactive Information Evolution of Rickshaw Art 🔗 Rickshaw Art Collections Around the World 🔗 Rickshaw: The Vehicle 🔗 > Select Publications Akbar, Shireen. Fukuoka: Fukuoka Art Museum, 1994. Rickshaw Painting – Traffic Art in Bangladesh. Akhnd, Shawon. “Cinema banner painting ebong o onnano onushongo” [“Cinema Banner Painting & Miscellaneous”]. In , edited by Lala Rukh Selim, 451-459. Vol. 8, Cultural Survey of Bangladesh Project. Dhaka: Asiatic Society of Bangladesh, 2007. Art and Crafts Gallagher, Rob. . Dhaka: The University Press Limited, 1992. The Rickshaws of Bangladesh Glassie, Henry. “Moving Pictures.” In , 420-432. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1997. Art and life in Bangladesh Glassie, Henry. “The Pictorial System.” In , 433-437. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1997. Art and life in Bangladesh Islam, Nazmul. . Master’s thesis, McGill University, 2015. A Study on Material Culture in Dhaka: Rickshaw, A Motion Craft Kirkpatrick, Joanna. “Bangladeshi Arts of the Ricksha.” , December 5, 1997, Asianart.com http://www.asianart.com/articles/ricksha/index.html Kirkpatrick, Joanna. “Metaphor and Motive in Bangladeshi Ricksha Art.” (2003). SCT – Correspondence, Memorandums, Minutes, and Miscellaneous http://hdl.handle.net/11209/10173. Kirkpatrick, Joanna. “Rickshaw Art.” In , edited by Meghna Guhathakurta and Willem van Schendel, 396-400. USA: Duke University Press, 2013. The Bangladesh Reader: History, Culture, Politics Kirkpatrick, Joanna. “The Painted Ricksha as Culture Theater.” 10, no. 3 (1984): 73-85. Studies in Visual Communication Kirkpatrick, Joanna. . Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2003. CD-ROM. Transports of Delight: The Ricksha Arts of Bangladesh Kirkpatrick, Joanna and Kevin Bubriski. “Transports of Delight: Ricksha Art Of Bangladesh.” 45, no. 1 (1994): 32-35. Aramco World Lahiri-Dutt, Kuntala, and David J Williams. . Ahmedabad, India: Mapin Publishing, 2010. Moving Pictures: Rickshaw art of Bangladesh Lasnier, France. . Dhaka: The University Press Limited, 2002. Rickshaw Art in Bangladesh Learmonth, Tom. "Rickshaw Art in Bangladesh." 39 (1991): 76-79. Mimar: Architecture in Development Rahman, Md Mostafijur. . Master’s Thesis, Charukala Institute, Dhaka University, 1992. Bangladesher Rickshaw Chitra Moishan, Shahman. “Representation of Anthropomorphic Beast in Rickshaw Painting: Figurative Fantasy of Social Biology.” , 12/13 (n.d.). Depart Magazine Warner, Rachel, Dan Jones, Barbara Joseph, Jayne Spittle, John Wallett, Tom Learmonth, and Shah Ahmed Sadeque. . Basement Project/Young World Books, 1989. Rickshaws: Art & Industry > Exhibitions/Projects 2020 , Group Project/Exhibition, Britto Arts Trust, Dhaka, Bangladesh 🔗 Rongbaaz 2017 Group Exhibition of S.A. Malek, National Art Gallery, Bangladesh Shilpakala Academy, Bangladesh 2016 , Solo Exhibition of Nobo Kumar Bhadra, Zoom Galerie of Alliance Française de Dhaka Summer in Colour 2016 , Curated by Joanna Kirkpatrick, The Huntington Archive 🔗 Bangladeshi Rickshaw Arts from 1972 to 1998 2016 , Solo Exhibition of Nobo Kumar Bhadra, Jahangirnagar University, Dhaka, Bangladesh 🔗 বাদল/Badal 2014 , Group Exhibition, Gallery Jalrong, Dhaka, Bangladesh Deshoj Spondon - 2 2014 Group Exhibition, Dhaka Rickshaw Fiesta Week 2014, National Museum of Dhaka, Bangladesh 2013 Solo Exhibition of Nobo Kumar Bhadra, La Gallerie of Alliance Francaise de Dhaka, Bangladesh 2013 , Group Exhibition, Zainul Gallery, University of Dhaka, Bangladesh Rickshaw Art Exhibition 2013 , Takamatsu, Japan Setouchi International Art Triennale 2010 Solo Exhibition of Nobo Kumar Bhadra, La Gallerie of Alliance Francaise de Dhaka, Bangladesh 2008 Solo Exhibition of S.A. Malek, the Club of Australian Embassy, Dhaka, Bangladesh 2005 Group Exhibition, Arranged by Britto Arts Trust, Alliance Francaise de Dhaka, Bangladesh 2000 Group Exhibition of S.A. Malek, German Embassy in Dhaka, Bangladesh 1999 Group Exhibition, Alliance Française de Dhaka, Bangladesh 1999 Solo Exhibition of S.A. Malek, Alliance Française de Dhaka, Bangladesh 1994 Rickshaw Painting - Traffic Art in Bangladesh , Fukuoka Art Museum, Fukuoka, Japan 🔗 1988-91 , The Museum of Mankind (now closed), London, UK Traffic Art: Rickshaw Paintings from Bangladesh 1987-8 , Touring Exhibition in the UK 🔗 Rickshaws: Art and Industry > Essays/Reviews , Rickshaw, Revival | Mohammad Zaki Rezwan | April 2020 🔗 Rongbaaz Please visit the section if you want to submit your essay. contribute > Documentary/Video works >

  • Rickshaws: Art and Industry | Rickshaw Art Archive

    Rickshaws: Art and Industry ​ Special thanks to for such rare access to this exhibition Tom Learmonth ​ 1987-8 Date: Touring exhibition in the UK. Venue: Rickshaw Exhibition Committee Presented by: Tom Learmonth Design and Production: Tom Learmonth and Shah Ahmed Sadeque (Mithu) Photography: Robert Gallagher and Dan Jones Text: War on Want, Christian Aid, Tollemache Trust, and Hilden Trust Funding: ​ Installation Shots © Tom Learmonth Tricycle for kids © Tom Learmonth © Tom Learmonth 1/19 Exhibits Rickshaw; manufactured in Bangladesh and reassembled by cyclists in London © Tom Learmonth Rickshaw; manufactured in Bangladesh and reassembled by cyclists in London © Tom Learmonth Rickshaw; manufactured in Bangladesh and reassembled by cyclists in London © Tom Learmonth 1/12 Gypsy Sardar (leader); Artist: Md. Gofur (probably) © Tom Learmonth Artist: Ahmed © Tom Learmonth Artist: Manik © Tom Learmonth 1/54 Painted seat cover; Artist: Ahmed; Year of creation: 1983 © Tom Learmonth Painted seat cover; Artist: Masud © Tom Learmonth Painted seat cover © Tom Learmonth 1/7 Decorative object for rickshaw © Tom Learmonth Part of the rickshaw hood © Tom Learmonth Decorative object for rickshaw © Tom Learmonth 1/20 Tools of rickshaw mechanics © Tom Learmonth Rickshaw registration plate © Tom Learmonth A pair of sandal worn by a unknown rickshaw puller © Tom Learmonth 1/5 Movie poster © Tom Learmonth Painted kula © Tom Learmonth Movie poster; Artwork by Shilpi; Year: 1984 © Tom Learmonth 1/5 Exhibition Texts and Study Pack Exhibition Plan and Proposal Exhibition Credit Warner, Rachel, Dan Jones, Barbara Joseph, Jayne Spittle, John Wallett, Tom Learmonth, and Shah Ahmed Sadeque. Rickshaws: Art & Industry . Basement Project/Young World Books, 1989. Go back

  • Contribute | Rickshaw Art Archive

    Contribute ​ How can we enrich this archive without your support? ​ If you want to contribute photos of rickshaw art to the archive, please use this . google form We invite short articles, essays, and reviews on rickshaw art of Bangladesh to be published as part of this archival project. Please to express your interest. contact us We accept donations in the form of photos purchased from commercial photo agencies and archives like , , etc. There are several photos of rickshaw art from 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s that we have been longing to include in this archive. Please for further information. Magnum Photos Getty Images contact us ​ If you have recently published any work on rickshaw art, please let us know using the option. We would be able to include that in our section. contact resources ​ Thank you in advance for your support! ​ ​

Rickshaw Art Archive